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Pig Processing & Slaughter / Industry News & Trends / North America
Jay Jandrain
Jay Jandrain, Butterball chief operating officer | Butterball
on May 19, 2017

Butterball to close former Gusto Packing pork plant

Company’s COO cites lack of vertical integration in pork complex, weakness in the material commodity markets

From WATTAgNet:

Butterball will close a plant in Montgomery, Illinois, that primarily processes pork products. The plant has about 600 full-time employees, who have been notified of the plans to shutter the facility in July.

The plant has been operated by Butterball since 2013, when the company acquired Gusto Packing Co.

For Butterball, which according to the WATTAgNet Top Poultry Companies Database is the largest turkey processor in the United States, the pork plant was a departure from the norm. Jay Jandrain, chief operating officer, said the 'lack of vertical integration in the pork complex and the weakness in the raw material commodity markets' were the primary reasons behind the decision to close the plant.

Jandrain stated that affected workers would be offered opportunities to relocate to other Butterball facilities.

Butterball intends to find a buyer for the plant.


Butterball plant in Montgomery to close

On Thursday, Butterball announced plans to close their plant in Montgomery in July. The company said the closure is expected to affect 600 employees.In a statement, Butterball COO Jay Jandrain said:'Today, we shared with our employees the very difficult decision that, to meet evolving consumer ...

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Butterball to close 600-employee plant in Montgomery

Butterball will shutter its Gusto meatpacking plant in Montgomery, where it employs about 600 full-time workers, marking another painful loss of jobs in the Aurora area. The North Carolina-based company's announcement comes after Caterpillar announced last month it would close its manufacturing plant in Montgomery by the end of 2018, resulting in a loss of 800 jobs.

Read More at Chicago Tribune

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