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on October 9, 2014

2 Tyson Foods plants to close in January 2015

Prepared Foods facilities in Buffalo, New York, and Santa Teresa, New Mexico, will operate through January 3, 2015; plant in Cherokee, Iowa, has already closed

Tyson Foods plants in Buffalo, New York, and Santa Teresa, New Mexico, are scheduled to close in January 2015, a company official confirmed on October 9. Both plants are part of Tyson Foods’ Prepared Foods business.

The company in July announced that the two plants, along with a plant in Cherokee, Iowa, would close and Tyson Foods would shift some of the production and equipment to other, more cost-efficient Tyson Foods locations. Exact closure dates had not been released at the time.

The Cherokee plant has already ceased operations, with September 27 as its last day of production. All three plants, were acquired by Tyson Foods when it acquired IBP Inc. in 2001.  The Buffalo facility produces hot dogs, sausage and hams. The plant in Santa Teresa makes a variety of cooked products including dinner meats, diced ham and roast beef. The Cherokee facility produced deli meats, hams, Canadian bacon and hot dogs.

“We’re very grateful for our many years in Buffalo, New York, and Santa Teresa, New Mexico. They’re both great communities and we’re very proud of our team members and what they were able to accomplish in making high-quality, great tasting food for our customers. Both plants are scheduled to operate through January 3, 2015,” said Tyson Foods spokesman Worth Sparkman.

“The business decision to close these plants was a difficult one, especially because we understand the impact it has on the people who have worked for us. However, closing these plants is what’s best for the long-term health of our business. We have examined all kinds of options over the last several months to try and have a different outcome, but this is the one that made the most business sense.”

An estimated 950 people were employed at the three plants.

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