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Feed Mill Management
on March 23, 2015
In the mix

World Feed Panorama: volumes and trends over 25 years

Feed International's annual industry survey tracks 300 million metric tons' worth of global feed industry growth since 1990.

Feed International's cover story this issue marks the 25th year of producing the World Feed Panorama, a WATT Global Media exclusive survey of global feed industry volumes and trends. In fact, since Feed International began tracking world volumes in 1990, total compound feed production has grown by nearly 60 percent. 

From booming populations in emerging markets to new technologies, the survey has witnessed years of struggle as well as prosperity. But beyond drought years and periods of growth, the peaks and valleys also mark greater economic and geopolitical changes. 

The report has captured the maturation of some markets and record growth in others. For example, Latin America’s feed production grew by a staggering 145 percent and the Asia-Pacific region has more than doubled its production since the first report ran; whereas Europe has added volumes of less than 9 percent.

The survey has also witnessed major shifts in the structure of feed companies. The rise of integrators—and consolidation—across the globe has lessened the amount of players in the market. 

An additional highlight worth noting: In 1990, most of the world’s feed production fed pigs; today, poultry feed accounts for nearly 50 percent of global feed volumes.  

After reading the World Feed Panorama report in this issue, please note that additional online-exclusive World Feed Panorama statistics and downloadable spreadsheets of data are available by logging in to Plus, simply follow the links provided within the article to other regional reports. In addition, the report’s author and key researcher Peter Best provides an in-depth review of the major developments and trends that have shaped the industry.  

I’m curious to see how the landscape changes over the next quarter century.

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