Denny’s has committed to sourcing and serving 100 percent cage-free eggs in all of its U.S. restaurants by 2026.

Denny’s serves more than 400 million eggs each year, including classic breakfast items such as the signature Build Your Own Grand Slam, omelettes and skillets.

“We believe our guests care about how their food is sourced and so do we. For more than 60 years, we have listened to our guests to understand what they care about the most, without sacrificing on quality, taste or value,” said John Miller, Denny’s president and CEO. “The humane treatment of animals remains an important part of our brand’s sourcing strategy, and our commitment to this transition underscores our confidence in the ethical evolution of supplier capabilities.”

Denny’s is the first within the family dining segment with a heavy emphasis on breakfast to commit to 100 percent cage-free eggs, underlining the brand’s dedication to the humane treatment of animals within its supply sourcing and its ongoing focus on quality, flavor and guest satisfaction.

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Greg Linford, vice president of procurement for Denny’s added, “As America’s diner, we’re proud to do our part to move the industry toward more humane sourcing practices. This shift towards a more humane method of egg production is just another step in ethical sourcing at Denny’s, adding to our requirements for ethical turkey, beef and pork treatment as well. We look forward to working closely with our suppliers to promote responsible sourcing, and refining our strategies as information, availability and supply chain capabilities evolve.”

Denny’s is the first within the family dining segment to commit to 100 percent cage-free eggs, underlining the brand’s dedication to the humane treatment of animals within its supply sourcing and its ongoing focus on quality, flavor and guest satisfaction.

Only two weeks into 2016, Denny’s becomes the third U.S. based restaurant chain to announce a move to cage-free eggs. Earlier in the year, Quiznos and Wendy's made the commitment to source and serve cage-free eggs. An infographic on companies pledging to use cage-free eggs during the final six months of 2015 appears on WATTAgNet.com.