Advertisement

News and analysis on the global poultry
and animal feed industries.
Poultry Processing & Slaughter / Broilers & Layers / Poultry Breeding & Genetics / Africa
woman-children-with-chicken-in-tanzania
The team leading the World Poultry Foundation is working in rural Nigeria and Tanzania to empower smallholder farmers – especially women – to earn higher incomes and improve the nutrition of their families through poultry-growing enterprises.
on February 7, 2017

US foundation works to end African poverty with chickens

The World Poultry Foundation has a $21.4 million grant from the Gates Foundation and a passion to improve lives in rural Africa with poultry.

Can the World Poultry Foundation (WPF) take a $21.4 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and, in four years, improve incomes and nutrition for millions of smallholder chicken farmers in rural Africa?

Read the entire report about the World Poultry Foundation's work in rural Nigeria and Tanzania in the February issue of WATT PoultryUSA.

That’s the challenge for the World Poultry Foundation team working in rural Nigeria and Tanzania to empower smallholder farmers – especially women – to earn higher incomes and improve the nutrition of their families through poultry-growing enterprises.

The foundation says the grant allows them to implement a strategy that gives rural farmers access to improved genetics, provides technical assistance and training, and allows access to new markets, with a goal of impacting 2.5 million households across Tanzania and Nigeria at the end of the four-year initiative. The goals are in alignment with the World Poultry Foundation’s mission, which has shifted from helping a trading partner out of self-interest (keeping the Russian market open to U.S. poultry) to helping people in underdeveloped nations where no gain is expected for the U.S. poultry industry.

The foundation will first establish over 1,500 “brooder units” that will acquire day-old chicks from low-input, dual-purpose modern poultry lines, grow the birds to four weeks of age, and sell the started chickens to smallholder farmers. The brooder units and farm enterprises will be integral parts of a self-sustaining system that continues to benefit its rural stakeholders even after the grant money is used up. The brooder units will provide ongoing training in poultry production management to the farmers; and the chicken farmers are to provide a market for the started chickens sold by the brooder units. The foundation also has plans to connect farmers to local markets where they can sell surplus chicken and eggs.

You'll also learn about:

Seed biotechnology: The impact on animal production

7 additives to replace antibiotics in US broiler feeds

Read the full article.

Comments powered by Disqus