What's Wrong with My Birds? Lameness conditions (Nutrition)

SPONSORED CONTENT

Nutrition plays a significant role in skeletal health and development, thus there are a multitude of nutritional factors that can lead to musculoskeletal diseases which are commonly characterized by lameness. The purpose of this table is to outline several nutritional factors that can contribute to increased incidence of lameness in poultry and offer approaches to help mitigate the damage caused by these conditions.

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The Importance of Day Old Chick Quality

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A 1-day old chick has the potential to become a broiler chicken, a layer or breeder. Given this versatility, the quality of day old chicks (DOCs) matters immensely to poultry businesses. This article addresses key development stages, focusing on most frequent disturbances in the field and relevant solutions.

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6 phytogenics questions broiler producers need to ask

Phytogenics are used mainly to enhance feed efficiency in broilers by increasing nutrient digestibility directly, as in the case of capsaisin, or indirectly, as with many compounds that control digesta microflora.

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What's Wrong with My Birds? Lameness conditions (bacterial pathogens)

SPONSORED CONTENT

In 50 years, broiler growth rates have increased dramatically due to intense genetic selection and enhanced nutritional programs. Fast growth places great demands on birds' musculoskeletal systems, which can result in impaired locomotion and lameness. This table focuses on lameness conditions caused by bacterial pathogens and suggests solutions that can help prevent or alleviate lameness caused by these conditions.

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Effective growth promoters are anti-inflammatory by nature, as is evident from omics and simple biomarkers

SPONSORED CONTENT

Previously, the beneficial effects of antimicrobial growth promoters (AGP) were attributed to their antibiotic characteristics, but neither with conclusive evidence, nor plausible mechanism. Growth (and health) in production animals is reciprocal to (intestinal) inflammation, so it seems logical that the observed effects are rather ba