See what topics were the most popular in the animal feed industry in January.


1. Cattle feed produced by Purina may be linked to animal deaths

Multiple reports of cattle deaths in Florida may be linked to animal feed, according to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.

 

2. ‘Sustainable’ dietary guidelines called attack on animal ag

A new report on sustainable nutrition and agriculture ignores scientific consensus and wildly overstates its own conclusions, scientists and industry leaders say.

 

3. Toxic poultry feed made with leather waste lands 2 in jail

Two people in Bangladesh have been sentenced to jail time for producing poultry feed using leather waste treated with toxic chemicals.

 

4. BLOG: New vitamin, trace mineral specifications for 2019

Ioannis Mavromichalis: A new project undertaken to update my animal nutrition consulting services.

 

5. New Butterball feed mill under construction

Construction of a new feed mill for Butterball in Yellville, Arkansas, is progressing, with the mill expected to be operational before the end of 2019.

 

6. Firefighter dies in explosion at Iowa ADM plant

One Eastern Iowa firefighter was killed and another was seriously injured when an explosion occurred at the Clinton, Iowa, Archer Daniels Midland Co. (ADM) plant last weekend.

 

7. Vets Plus acquires Merrick’s Animal Health

Animal health and nutrition company Vets Plus has acquired Merrick’s Animal Health, which makes animal feed additives for livestock. Both companies are based in Wisconsin.

 

8. FDA reports steep decline in antibiotic sales for animal feed

Despite the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) report that U.S. sales of antibiotics have dropped by one-third, it could be several years before experts are certain what the trend means for animal health or the spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

 

9. World animal feed volumes reach 1.103 billion metric tons in 2018

Global animal feed volumes reached 1.103 billion metric tons in 2018 — growing by 3 percent over 2017 production, according to Alltech’s 2019 Global Feed Survey.

 

10. BLOG: Blaming animal proteins for disease spread is naive

Ioannis Mavromichalis: Instead of calling for a ban every time a disease emerges, we should focus on quality assurance and buying from reputable suppliers.