The nationally determined contributions (known as NDC) are the emission reduction targets that every country made and presented at the Paris Agreement in 2013 to be complied with by 2030. NDCs are made of three elements: greenhouse gas-effect emissions by type of gas, compound and sector, a baseline to 2030 and the decarbonization plan by sectors.

According to information reported by Iniciativa Climática, a Mexican climate think tank, agriculture in Mexico accounts for approximately 13% of the total greenhouse effect gas emissions. Just for the sake of comparison, transportation produces more, around 25%, as well as other sectors. However, that does not mean we should be stunned.

The current Mexican government seems to be doing nothing about it and on the contrary, going backwards. So I guess, the animal production industry needs to do something on its own, before it is pointed out.

While attending the last two animal production shows - SPACE and FIGAN - it was evident for me how many companies are focusing on technology for methanization, slurry management, composting and so on, to produce clean energy and reduce emissions. Let's be clear ─ this is not only for cows (which seem to be the bad guys in this movie), but all animals, including swine, and yes, poultry too, to a lesser extent, though.

I have blogged about solar energy in Latin American poultry facilities and other issues related to gas emissions. Even though I don't agree with many other trendy issues, I do agree with the fact that we need to change and adapt production to reduce our footprint.

While riding a taxi to the Spanish animal production trade show, FIGAN, I had a nice conversation with the driver. An educated man and a supporter of animal ag, he pointed out: "it is not that we need to reduce meat consumption, as many groups say. But rather, it is that we need to change the way we produce. Nature should be taken care of". Nothing more truth than this.

The question still remains on cost efficiency and who will pay for it.

What do you think?

The nationally determined contributions (known as NDC) are the emission reduction targets that every country made and presented at the Paris Agreement in 2013 to be complied with by 2030. NDCs are made of three elements: greenhouse gas-effect emissions by type of gas, compound and sector, a baseline to 2030 and the decarbonization plan by sectors.

According to information reported by Iniciativa Climática, a Mexican climate think tank, agriculture in Mexico accounts for approximately 13% of the total greenhouse effect gas emissions. Just for the sake of comparison, transportation produces more, around 25%, as well as other sectors. However, that does not mean we should be stunned.

The current Mexican government seems to be doing nothing about it and on the contrary, going backwards. So I guess, the animal production industry needs to do something on its own, before it is pointed out.

While attending the last two animal production shows - SPACE and FIGAN - it was evident for me how many companies are focusing on technology for methanization, slurry management, composting and so on, to produce clean energy and reduce emissions. Let's be clear ─ this is not only for cows (which seem to be the bad guys in this movie), but all animals, including swine, and yes, poultry too, to a lesser extent, though.

I have blogged about solar energy in Latin American poultry facilities and other issues related to gas emissions. Even though I don't agree with many other trendy issues, I do agree with the fact that we need to change and adapt production to reduce our footprint.

While riding a taxi to the Spanish animal production trade show, FIGAN, I had a nice conversation with the driver. An educated man and a supporter of animal ag, he pointed out: "it is not that we need to reduce meat consumption, as many groups say. But rather, it is that we need to change the way we produce. Nature should be taken care of". Nothing more truth than this.

The question still remains on cost efficiency and who will pay for it.

What do you think?