October 8th was this year's World Egg Day. I always (always!) have eggs for breakfast, so this time I decided to have eggs as my protein for lunch. I went on and cooked a very nice quiche, served it with a wonderful salad and a small glass of wine to celebrate the day. I actually published the photo on both Twitter and Instagram!

Meanwhile, I took the time to review what the five largest egg producers in Latin America did to celebrate this day. Argentina (with a per capita consumption of 310 eggs) donated eggs to welfare community centers and created videos with cardiologists or pediatricians advising to eat eggs, according to their medical specialty. Brazil had '"lives," for instance, for people with bariatric surgery, among others. Also, an egg quality contest. Currently, Brazilians eat 251 eggs per year.

Meanwhile, Colombia, already with 325 eggs of per capita consumption, hosted several virtual events focused to increase physical activity tying it with eggs, the launching of a book about eggs and health professionals taking about its health benefits, an egg recipe marathon as well as other presentations for the elderly and children.

Mexico - with a steady per capita consumption of 377 eggs - had a full program of presentations on topics like cardiovascular health or physical activity, how to cook with eggs and the role of this poultry product in the nutrition of the elderly.

Lastly, Peru, which has a per capita consumption of 244 eggs, had an egg donation program to groups of its population in vulnerable situations, launched a promotional campaign with influencers as well as sports and cuisine personalities.

While I was doing this, I thought – where is the cholesterol misconception in eggs? Is it gone? Looks like it .

I think all the poultry associations have moved on talking about eggs. The focus is no longer the myth of "high cholesterol", but rather on the benefits of consuming them tied to healthy aspects of life and well-being.

I think this is good news. The next step is to get rid of the myth of hormones in broilers.

What do you think?

October 8th was this year's World Egg Day. I always (always!) have eggs for breakfast, so this time I decided to have eggs as my protein for lunch. I went on and cooked a very nice quiche, served it with a wonderful salad and a small glass of wine to celebrate the day. I actually published the photo on both Twitter and Instagram!

Meanwhile, I took the time to review what the five largest egg producers in Latin America did to celebrate this day. Argentina (with a per capita consumption of 310 eggs) donated eggs to welfare community centers and created videos with cardiologists or pediatricians advising to eat eggs, according to their medical specialty. Brazil had '"lives," for instance, for people with bariatric surgery, among others. Also, an egg quality contest. Currently, Brazilians eat 251 eggs per year.

Meanwhile, Colombia, already with 325 eggs of per capita consumption, hosted several virtual events focused to increase physical activity tying it with eggs, the launching of a book about eggs and health professionals taking about its health benefits, an egg recipe marathon as well as other presentations for the elderly and children.

Mexico - with a steady per capita consumption of 377 eggs - had a full program of presentations on topics like cardiovascular health or physical activity, how to cook with eggs and the role of this poultry product in the nutrition of the elderly.

Lastly, Peru, which has a per capita consumption of 244 eggs, had an egg donation program to groups of its population in vulnerable situations, launched a promotional campaign with influencers as well as sports and cuisine personalities.

While I was doing this, I thought – where is the cholesterol misconception in eggs? Is it gone? Looks like it .

I think all the poultry associations have moved on talking about eggs. The focus is no longer the myth of "high cholesterol", but rather on the benefits of consuming them tied to healthy aspects of life and well-being.

I think this is good news. The next step is to get rid of the myth of hormones in broilers.

What do you think?