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Webinar: How to choose the right plant protein for young animal feed

3/25/21
Online - On-Demand Webinar

WATTPoultry and Feed Strategy webinarWat on-demand now to learn how to choose the right plant protein for young animal feed.

In this webinar, learn what is the benefit of using plant protein in swine feed and how to use it for swine feed corresponding to animal requirements. Soybean meal (SBM) is the most widely used protein supplement in non-ruminant feeds globally. The soybean is an excellent source of protein and other important nutrients. However, soybean also contains several substances that can hinder the digestibility in the gut of young animals, such as antigenic protein, oligosaccharides, phytic acid, lectins, and trypsin inhibitors. As a whole, these are called anti-nutritional factors (ANFs). The main storage protein in SBM is anti-nutritional factors (ANFs) that limit SBM use in nursery diets. ANFs have allergenic CJ Bio logoeffects that can cause gut inflammation, diarrhea, and thus a reduction in growth. Gut inflammation affects the immune system and the oxidative stress status damaging the intestinal epithelium, especially in young animals. Young animals have immature digestive tracts that are susceptible to many nutritional challenges during their early development, such as in the weaning period in piglets and 0–7-day starter phase in broilers. At this early stage of growth, birds need a raw material, which can easily be digested to provide sufficient amounts of essential nutrients to meet their requirements. Animal protein supplements have been largely used in nursery diets as a source of protein without ANF and with high bioavailability of ANF, enhancing the growth and health in newly weaned pigs. Due to climate change and overfishing, animal proteins are on a global decline, and international prices are continuously increasing. But animal protein has been on the decline worldwide due to food safety reasons, and vegetable protein has been suggested as an alternative for the sustainable aquaculture industry. So, the crude protein in plant protein such as SPC and FSBM is similar to animal protein ingredients with low concentration of ANF. Therefore, SPC and FSBM can be used in nursery diets replacing animal protein ingredients. The featured speakers will be Dr. Alfons Jansman, Ph.D., senior scientist, at Wageningen Livestock Research in Wageningen, The Netherlands., and Dr. Han. H. Stein, Ph.D., professor of animal science at the University of Illinois. The webinar will be moderated by Dr. Ioannis Mavromichalis, Ph.D., international consulting nutritionist and prolific writer/author with a focus on young animal nutrition.

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN:

  1. What are the values of processed soybean meals like SPC and FSBM for swine feed formulation?
  2. What are technologies for feed formulation primarily for pigs but also for poultry?
  3. How to choose the right plant protein for young animal feed.

This webinar is sponsored by CJ Bio and is presented by WATTPoultry, FeedStrategy and WATT Global Media.


Speaker Info:

Hans SteinDr. Han. H. Stein, Ph.D., professor of animal science at the University of Illinois

Dr. Hans H. Stein is a professor of Nutrition in the Division of Nutritional Sciences and the Department of Animal Sciences at the University of Illinois, where he has responsibilities in research, Extension, and teaching. He currently directs 5 Graduate students, three post-doctoral Research Fellows, three research managers, and six visiting scholars. His research focuses on feed ingredient evaluation, digestibility and utilization of energy and nutrients by pigs and humans, and the development of systems for accurate diet formulation. Dr. Stein has authored or co-authored approximately 280 peer-reviewed publications and he has given invited presentations on nutrition in 41 countries.

 

Dr. Alfons JansmanDr. Alfons Jansman, Ph.D., senior scientist, at Wageningen Livestock Research in Wageningen, The Netherlands

Dr. Alfons Jansman, senior scientist at Wageningen Livestock Research in Wageningen, The Netherlands. After graduating from the Wageningen University in 1987, he obtained his Ph.D. at the same university in 1993 on a thesis entitled “Tannins in feedstuffs for simple-stomached animals”. He was employed from 1993 till 2003 by TNO (Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research) as a scientist in animal nutrition. Since 2003 he is working at Wageningen Livestock Research, The Netherlands as a senior scientist in animal nutrition (pigs and poultry). His main areas of expertise are the nutritional evaluation of feed ingredients, digestive physiology in pigs, amino acid requirements and metabolism, and nutrition and health in pigs and poultry.