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Egg Production / Industry News & Trends

World Egg Day and egg euphemisms

French-egg-packaging
Examples of French egg packaging. | Benjamin Ruiz

There is nothing wrong with simply calling them ‘eggs’

October 9, 2017

This coming Friday, October 13, World Egg Day will once again be celebrated. A great many events throughout the week are already prepared. Eggs are the "most egalitarian protein," as Paul Aho says. Yes, they are.

But despite being the most egalitarian protein, the most accessible animal protein for the poor population, some insist on looking for attributes and giving it an image that it does not need. It is already natural, is already the best animal protein, its amino acid profile is already the benchmark for other proteins. What else is really needed?

I have baptized today these attributes and different names as egg euphemisms. According to the Merriam-Webster dictionary, a euphemism is “the substitution of an agreeable or inoffensive expression for one that may offend or suggest something unpleasant”. To this word, I added the prefix ovo, to refer to the egg.

It would seem that simply putting "eggs" in a package is rude and that several things must be added to turn it into an attractive product. To show something, see the images that illustrate this blog, taken from some examples from France, where other attributes stand out, like that eggs come from free-range hens, that eggs are dated on the day they were laid, from hens reared on the ground or eggs of Marans hens, even more than the word “eggs” (ouefs)! And God knows what else is out there.

Are eggs better because they come from Marans hens? Or because they display the date that the hen laid them? They are simply eggs. Yes, more expensive. Marketing working in full. For me this is a hoax. They are working with feelings. To paraphrase Galileo: “... and yet it is still an egg": 6.4 g of proteins, 4.8 g of lipids, 70 kcal and a myriad of vitamins and minerals (average of one 50-g egg).

What do you think?

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