Dairy Queen on track to meet cage-free commitment by 2025

Through its subsidiaries, IDQ develops, licenses and services a system of more than 7,000 restaurants in the United States, Canada and more than 20 other countries.

Wolterk, BigStock.com
Wolterk, BigStock.com

International Dairy Queen Corporation (IDQ) is on track to meet its cage-free egg commitment in the U.S. and Canada for shell eggs, liquid eggs and DQ proprietary products by 2025, the company announced on January 13.

“In 2016, we made a commitment to animal welfare when we announced our transition to cage-free eggs in the U.S. and Canada by 2025,” said Steve Min, executive vice president of research and development at International Dairy Queen. “As we continue to make progress toward our goal, we reduced the number of proprietary ingredients not yet using cage-free eggs by more than 35%. I am pleased to share that now 100% of proprietary ingredients in Blizzard Treats contain cage-free eggs, and we are on track to meet our cage-free egg commitment in 2025 or sooner.”

The IDQ cage-free egg commitment includes shell and liquid eggs at restaurants that serve breakfast and eggs that are used as an ingredient in a variety of DQ proprietary food and treat products. IDQ also committed that any new egg or ingredient supplier in its system is required to provide cage-free eggs.

According to the company website, IDG only sources eggs from producers that meet the following welfare standards:

  • Cage-free, climate-controlled barns with controlled lighting and ventilation.
  • 24/7 access to food, water and proper nutrition.
  • Healthcare monitored by licensed veterinarians.
  • Proper handling and transportation.
  • Efforts to reduce stress prior to harvest.
  • To be harvested using humane practices.

Through its subsidiaries, IDQ develops, licenses and services a system of more than 7,000 restaurants in the United States, Canada and more than 20 other countries.

The IDG statement from the company comes just one day after The Humane League launched its “Cage-Free Eggspose” calling out the companies who have yet to report any progress on those goals. In addition to Dairy Queen, Arbys, Nugget Market and Lucky's Market all released its cage-free stance in response to the Humane League report. 

Other animal welfare policies

Although IDQ is on its way to cage-free, currently they have no plans to source no antibiotics ever products.

“We believe that chickens should be treated humanely, from hatch to harvest, when they are well and when they are ill. While we do not support the routine use of medically important antibiotics, we believe sick animals must be treated appropriately to reduce or end suffering and to control a disease outbreak. When antibiotics are administered by a licensed veterinarian for therapeutic purposes only, they contribute to overall animal well-being,” the company website said.

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