The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed two new cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) that involve breeder flocks.

APHIS announced that on May 18 HPAI was confirmed in a flock of commercial turkey breeder hens in Kandiyohi County, Minnesota, and a commercial duck breeder flock in Berks County, Pennsylvania.

The Minnesota case involved 4,700 turkeys, while the Pennsylvania case involved 7,200 ducks.

Just one day earlier, HPAI was confirmed in a commercial layer flock in Berks County.

To date, Pennsylvania has had 15 flocks affected by HPAI, seven of which were in Berks County, while all other cases in the state were in Lancaster County.

Minnesota has had more confirmed cases of HPAI in 2022 than any other state, with 58 flocks affected. Of those, nine have been in Kandiyohi County, and all cases in that county have involved turkeys.

So far in 2022, HPAI has been confirmed in commercial poultry flocks in Michigan, Wisconsin, Oklahoma, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas, Iowa, Missouri, Kentucky, Indiana, Colorado, North Carolina, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania and Utah. The virus has also been found in commercial game bird operations in Texas, New York and South Dakota.

Advertisement

New case in Canada

A new case of HPIA has also been reported in Canada. According to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), the latest case was confirmed in York, Ontario, on May 18.

CFIA has not disclosed the number of birds involved in the case, or the species of birds in the flock.

Ontario’s four most recent cases of HPAI have been in the York Municipality, with cases being confirmed on May 4, May 6 and May 10.

HPAI has been confirmed in all of Canada’s provinces, but it has not affected commercial poultry in Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island or New Brunswick.

To learn more about HPAI cases in North American commercial poultry flocks, see an interactive map on WATTPoultry.com.

Read our ongoing coverage of the global avian influenza outbreak.