South Dakota’s 45th case of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in a commercial poultry flock has been confirmed.

According to information from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), the latest case was confirmed on November 21, in a commercial meat turkey operation in Edmunds County. There were 35,000 birds involved.

So far in 2022, Edmunds County has had five confirmed cases of HPAI, including two meat turkey flocks, two turkey breeder hen flocks and one turkey breeder replacement hen flock. Between the five cases, an estimated 154,700 birds in Edmunds County have been lost to HPAI.

Prior to this case, Edmunds County had not had any confirmed detections of HPAI since April, while the last case in the state was reported on November 1.

With 45 commercial poultry flocks in South Dakota having been infected by HPAI in 2021, only Minnesota has had more flocks affected at 78. In terms of the number of birds lost to HPAI, South Dakota ranks ninth with about 1.86 million birds that have died. Only Iowa, Nebraska, Pennsylvania, Colorado, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin and Utah have reported more bird losses.

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One more British Columbia flock hit by avian flu

The recent surge in HPAI cases in commercial flocks in Abbotsford, British Columbia, is continuing, with one more case in that municipality being confirmed on November 21.

Since November 16, Abbotsford has had seven confirmed cases of HPAI in commercial poultry, according to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA), but CFIA has not disclosed the size of those flocks or the types of birds involved.

Of the eight most recent HPAI cases in the province, seven have appeared in Abbotsford. The other case to be recently confirmed in British Columbia was in Chilliwack. So far in 2022, British Columbia has had 15 HPAI cases in commercial poultry.

To learn more about HPAI cases in commercial poultry flocks in the United States and Canada, see an interactive map on WATTPoultry.com. 

Read our ongoing coverage of the global avian influenza outbreak.