Vital Farms: Transparency will bring diners back to foodservice

Foodservice locations will need to rebuild trust with consumers that are wary about dining out during the COVID-19 pandemic, Russell Diez-Canseco, President and CEO, Vital Farms, said during Building Trust Through Transparency.

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eric1513 | Bigstock.com
eric1513 | Bigstock.com

Foodservice locations will need to rebuild trust with consumers that are wary about dining out during the COVID-19 pandemic, Russell Diez-Canseco, President and CEO, Vital Farms, said during Building Trust Through Transparency.

“Consumers are still more concerned about public health than the economy. As a result, their routines are changing for the long-haul – no more commutes, no more coffee stops and, even though they are sick of it, they are continuing to cook at home,” he explained.

“It’s more important than ever that diners trust your brand for health and safety and, at a much higher level, that you are leading with your conscience. It’s clear from research that your restaurant’s decisions impact where you dine and meeting these needs can give you an edge.”

Today’s consumers want to know more about how their food is made, where the ingredients come from and the culture behind a product or company – a trend that has been accelerated by the COVID-19 global pandemic.

Honesty, authenticity and transparency are increasingly important to consumers, according to Vital Farms research that revealed:

  • 75% of purchasing decisions are somewhat impacted by transparent communication.
  • 68% of purchasing decisions are somewhat impacted by the source of ingredients.
  • 65% of purchasing decisions are somewhat impacted by environmentally friendly practices.
  • 56% of purchasing decisions are somewhat impacted by a commitment to fair wages.

“Helping people get the food that they’ve decided they want requires a lot of communication and transparency, so they understand exactly what they’re getting. That’s a journey that restaurants will have to go on as well,” Diez-Conseco said.

The value of eggs

As foodservice demand recovers, Diez-Canseco noted that consumer demand for eggs remains strong.

“Eggs continue to be a household staple. We continue to see per capita consumption of eggs increase in the United States and that’s reflected on foodservice menus as well,” he said.

In fact, he said that diners spent more when dishes containing eggs included premium eggs, according to data from 2019.

“When you crack the code of communicating the value of the choice you made, it is possible to capture the value and make it a profitable move to do so,” Diez-Canseco explained.

View our continuing coverage of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

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