Multiple reports of mycotoxins in corn as harvest continues

The past week brought new confirmed reports of deoxynivalenol (DON), aflatoxin and fumonisin in corn, as well as the first report of zearalenone in corn silage, according to Neogen’s Monday Mycotoxin and Crop Report from September 24.

(igor stevanovic | Bigstock.com)
(igor stevanovic | Bigstock.com)

The past week brought new confirmed reports of deoxynivalenol (DON), aflatoxin and fumonisin in corn, as well as the first report of zearalenone in corn silage, according to Neogen’s Monday Mycotoxin and Crop Report from September 24.

The newest reports of DON in corn came from South Dakota, Wisconsin, and Ontario, Canada. This is in addition to a previous report of DON in corn from Nebraska.

A new report of aflatoxin in corn came from Arkansas. Previous reports of aflatoxin in corn have come from Oklahoma, Missouri, Iowa, Texas, Kansas and Georgia.

A new report of fumonisin in corn came from Nebraska. Previous reports of fumonisin in corn have from Arkansas, Oklahoma, Texas and Missouri.

This year’s first report of zearalenone in corn silage came from South Dakota.

There were no new reports of mycotoxins in barley or wheat. Spring wheat and barley harvests are nearly complete in most of the Northwest and Northern Plains. Quality and yield trends for these crops are mainly the same as last week. Previous reports of DON in barley have come from Pennsylvania and Minnesota. Previous reports of DON in winter wheat have come from Wisconsin, Ohio, New Jersey, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Indiana, North Carolina, Maryland, Delaware, Tennessee, Virginia and Illinois.

Corn harvest continues

Ninety-three percent of corn has reached the dented stage, which is seven points above the five-year average. Fifty-four percent of corn is fully mature, 18 points above the five-year average. Nine percent of corn acres have been harvested, three points above the five-year average.

Sixty-eight percent of corn is in good to excellent condition, while 12 percent is in poor to very poor condition. States with the highest poor to very poor ratings are Missouri, Texas, North Carolina, Kansas, Michigan and South Dakota. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) statistics do not take into account the recent flooding in the Carolinas from Hurricane Florence.

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