2 states report DON in wheat, weather continues to affect crops

The cool, wet spring weather could have a significant impact on grain quality and yield this harvest season, according to Neogen’s first Monday Mycotoxin and Crop Report of the year.

Less corn will be available across the U.S. for feeding animals this year, so the use of wheat is expected to increase. (fredleonero | Bigstock.com)
Less corn will be available across the U.S. for feeding animals this year, so the use of wheat is expected to increase. (fredleonero | Bigstock.com)

The cool, wet spring weather could have a significant impact on grain quality and yield this harvest season, according to Neogen’s first Monday Mycotoxin and Crop Report of the year.

Through May, 2019 has the sixth wettest year since 1895 and average U.S. spring temperatures have been .1 degree Fahrenheit below the mean of the past 100 years, Neogen said. The Eastern Corn Belt, Midwest, mid-south and parts of the Great Plains have been affected by excessive rain. In addition, the Southern Plains, Northern Plains and Michigan experienced lower-than-normal temperatures in the spring, while the Southeast and Pacific Northwest saw temperatures above normal.

“Crop insurance conditions brought on by weather-related delays and the option to plant shorter-season crops forced farmers to plant less corn than normal,” Neogen said, adding that 3.13 million acres are not planted due to rain.

Ninety-seven percent of intended corn acres are planted, four points behind the five-year average. Michigan, Indiana and Ohio had double-digit reductions in net planted corn acres compared with previous years.

Eighty-nine percent of corn has emerged, compared with a five-year average of 100%. The states furthest behind are Michigan, Ohio and South Dakota. Fifty-six percent of corn is in good to excellent condition and 12% is in poor to very poor condition. Michigan, Ohio and Missouri have the highest percentages of corn in poor to very poor condition.

Other crops

Winter wheat is 94% headed, four points below last year and five points below the five-year average. Sixty-one percent of winter wheat is in good to excellent condition and 11% is in poor to very poor condition. Only 15% of winter wheat is harvested, which is 19 points below the five-year average. States the furthest behind on their harvest are Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas.

Spring wheat is only 7% headed – 22 points behind the five-year average. Seventy-five percent of spring wheat is in good to excellent condition and 3% is in poor to very poor condition.

Deoxynivalenol has been confirmed in wheat in North Carolina and Maryland.

Barley is 9% headed, which is 21 points behind the five-year average. Ninety-seven percent of barley has emerged, two points behind the five-year average. Seventy-two percent of barley is in good to excellent condition, while 5% is in poor to very poor condition.

Oats are 43% headed, which is 25 points below the five-year average. Sixty-four percent of oats are in good to excellent condition, and 7% is in poor to very poor condition.

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