Is Mexico backing up on GM corn ban or not?

The clock is ticking and there are barely 13 months for the Presidential Decree in Mexico banning the use of glyphosate and genetically modified (GM) corn to come into effect.

Ruiz B 90x90 Headshot
(Benjamín Ruiz)
(Benjamín Ruiz)

The clock is ticking and there are barely 13 months for the Presidential Decree in Mexico banning the use of glyphosate and genetically modified (GM) corn to come into effect.

Reading the progress report of the Mexican Government makes you wonder whether this is a joke, if they really believe what is reported or if the actual plan is to nullify food security. I mean, they give details about community orchards, a photo exhibition on glyphosate and GM corn, educational materials, celebrations of Mother Earth Day and even a concert of Mexican music with an “environmental perspective.” Nothing serious is reported on how this will be counteracted, on a serious economic analysis, on how we Mexicans are going to be facing this. 

Just recently, Bosco de la Vega, a well-known ag businessman who participated in the NAFTA negotiations and in many private trade organizations said that up to now Mexico imports “83.3% of rice, 37.2% of corn, 65.1% of wheat, 96% of soybeans, 22.7% of milk, 21.4% of poultry meat and 39.1% of pork.”

In 2019, de la Vega signed the National Agreement for Food Self-sufficiency together with President López Obrador. Unfortunately, the goals of this Agreement are far from being achieved. De la Vega is requesting the President to correct this policy.

On November 22, President López Obrador said during his daily morning conference that the glyphosate issue “is a controversy that has not yet been resolved,” that “there is not yet an alternative.” Afterwards, he asked his party to put off the process and requested the Department of Economy to make a further and deeper analysis. About GM corn, there is still a negative regarding white corn for human consumption. But yellow corn for animal consumption, he said “they are checking this out.” 

What a mess – blaming multinationals, putting political ideology before the needs of the population, fights among politicians and so on. And where is the food? I definitely do not plan to go to my community orchard in the middle of a huge urban area to pick up my tomatoes and feed my chickens with god knows what. Or maybe I would end up doing it.

What do you think? 

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