2022's top 5 blogs – eggs and sustainability lead the way

As the year comes to an end, I would like to share once again with you all, my top five blogs in terms of readership out of the 48 I published this year.

Ruiz B 90x90 Headshot
harvepino | Bigstock.com
harvepino | Bigstock.com

As the year comes to an end, I would like to share once again with you all, my top five blogs in terms of readership out of the 48 I published this year. These were as follows:

  1. World per capita egg consumption record broken by Mexico, again
  2. Climate concerns and eating animal protein in Latam
  3. Pope urges inclusion, but headlines say eat less meat
  4. Sorghum – the “forgotten” grain for poultry
  5. Millions of layers in Argentina die of heatstroke

The one blog that was read the most was about breaking the egg consumption record of Mexico, the second largest poultry industry in Latin America, but with the largest layer flock. Mexico has had the highest per capita egg consumption in the world for years, and when we thought the highest point was reached, the record was broken again.

The number two subject matter was about climate change and animal protein consumption. Sustainability is on everyone’s mind and is becoming part of animal production. Latin American animal protein producers want to know more about this. But linking sustainability with animal protein consumption in a poor region like Latin America needs extra, insightful studies.

The third blog goes in line with animal protein consumption but more specifically on misinformation and lobbyist interests. I wrote another blog about this that did not make it to the top five, but shows what a poor job we all in the industry – producers, companies, associations, academia, professionals and specialized media – are doing in teaching the general media and public what we do.

The fourth blog is about a good ol’ friend of animal nutrition – sorghum, that for many reasons (I think cost at the forefront) is not being used with more frequency. Lastly, a headline of millions of birds dying of heatstroke in Argentina was very appealing. This needs no extra explanations.

Anyways, thanks for reading my comments. Again, I hope I contributed with positive thinking!

Happy New Year 2023 to all! 

Page 1 of 105
Next Page