Health-conscious shoppers are valuable to the meat department

One in four Americans surveyed for the 2020 Power of Meat Report are invested in making healthy meat and protein choices. These shoppers tend to be affluent, spend more on meat per person than average and make multiple grocery trips a week.

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New Africa | Bigstock.com
New Africa | Bigstock.com

One in four Americans surveyed for the 2020 Power of Meat Report are invested in making healthy meat and protein choices. These shoppers tend to be affluent, spend more on meat per person than average and make multiple grocery trips a week.

The 15th annual Power of Meat Report, published by the Food Industry Association and the Foundation for Meat and Poultry Research and Education, the foundation for the North American Meat Institute, explores shopper perceptions, attitudes and behaviors regarding fresh and processed meat and poultry.

Some demographics

Demographically, affluent households (34%), baby boomers (33%), and West coasters (32%) were the most likely shopping cohorts to value healthy animal protein choices. Health-focused shoppers were more likely to make frequent trips to the meat department, spending more per person with each visit.

Consumers that were focused on making healthy choices also placed high value on social and environmental responsibility and animal welfare.

“People focused on health tend to also have an above average focus on sustainability, social responsibility and animal care. While shoppers are unlikely to adapt every purchase or make rigorous changes to their grocery purchases, many are tweaking selections for themselves or their surroundings, as is evidenced by the sales numbers,” the report said.

Consumers want direction

Nearly half of consumers indicated that they want suggestions for more nutritious meat and poultry choices. Shoppers were most interested in suggestions for nutritious choices that don’t cost more (49%) and don’t sacrifice taste (40%).

Nearly half (41%) of consumers said that having the protein amount highlighted on meat and poultry packages would be great to have.

“Dietary callouts and information, such as calories, sodium and fat content, having a retail dietitian or nutrition expert available or simple suggestions for substituting for a different fat percentage or protein type would be well received. Additionally, as the role of health and well-being is growing, these are all great ways to build differentiating advantages in a commodity market,” the report added.

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