Do Good Foods launches carbon reduced eggs

Do Good Foods, a climate-forward food company that upcycles leftover grocery store food into animal feed, has announced its new product, Do Good Eggs.

(Do Good Foods)
(Do Good Foods)
Do Good Foods

Do Good Foods, a climate-forward food company that upcycles leftover grocery store food into animal feed, has announced its new product, Do Good Eggs

Similar to its carbon reduced chicken, a dozen Do Good Eggs will save approximately one pound of greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) from entering the atmosphere. 

Do Good Foods has an exclusive deal with Michael Foods, a subsidiary of Post Holdings and the largest foodservice supplier of egg products in the U.S.

“Our partnership with Michael Foods is monumental for Do Good Foods. The fact is that we can, and must, solve the biggest environmental problems while fitting it into the existing food system to make a real difference at an incredible scale,” said Justin Kamine, co-founder and Co-CEO of Do Good Foods. 

“This is why this partnership is so exciting – we have the potential to forever change the environmental impact of food waste simply by consuming more of one of the most popular and nutritious proteins on the planet in eggs.”

What are carbon reduced eggs?

By using leftover food from grocery stores for animal feed, Do Good Foods redirects about four pounds of food waste per chicken product from being sent to a landfill, which avoids about three pounds of GHG per product. 

Do Good Eggs will be available for retailers starting 2023, and purchasers will receive a monthly “carbon receipt” calculating the measurable results that switching to Do Good Eggs has on fighting climate change. 

“This partnership gives us the capability to bring our customers a truly sustainable solution without having to compromise on the nutrition, flavor or convenience of our eggs,” said Mark Westphal, president of Michael Foods. “Consumers and corporations alike are craving real change and now our eggs, in partnership with Do Good Eggs, are able to support the movement toward bettering our planet.”

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Environmental Protection Agency, 40% of healthy grocery store food is sent to landfills, and $408 billion worth of food is unsold or uneaten every year.  

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